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Alumni Day 2019 crowd

Get ready for a jam-packed day of Bruin spirit

Alumni Day, TedxUCLA and a projection show on Royce Hall will kick off UCLA's 100th birthday year on May 18.
May 17, 2019
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Alumni Day 2019 crowd

A conversation among three UCLA chancellors. Tours highlighting campus buildings, artwork and even some labs not usually open to the public. Renowned speakers exploring the idea of time. And a spectacular light-and-sound show projected onto Royce Hall, inspired by 100 years of UCLA history.

Welcome to the kickoff of UCLA’s 100th birthday.

More than 5,000 people are expected to visit campus on Saturday, May 18 for an activity-filled UCLA Alumni Day and TEDxUCLA. After those two events, the exterior of iconic Royce Hall will become the backdrop for “Lighting the Way,” a light-and-sound show that highlights the people, breakthroughs and moments that defined UCLA’s first century. The display, which begins at 9 p.m., will be free and open to the public.

Just a few of the many activities for returning Bruins on Alumni Day:

  • Visit the 18 labs and archives in the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology
  • Watch a screening of the 2018 Oscar-winning documentary “Period. End of Sentence.” that was produced by 1989 UCLA graduate Melissa Berton
  • Hear Institute of American Cultures faculty discuss the important contributions made by UCLA’s ethnic studies centers during the past 50 years

There will also performances by UCLA music and dance ensembles; meet-ups and tours for alumni networks and groups; talks by esteemed UCLA graduates, faculty and guest speakers; as well a lounge at Wilson Plaza (map) where Bruins can relax and socialize with one another.

Among the speakers at TEDxUCLA will be Olympian Jordyn Wieber, who will talk about her journey from gold medal-winning gymnast to leader of the revolution to expose sexual abuse in her sport; Shawntel Okonkwo, a UCLA doctoral candidate in molecular biology and gene regulation, who will discuss how systems of power affect those who are most marginalized in society; and Mayank Mehta, a UCLA physics professor who will explain how virtual reality could affect how we perceive space, time and brain health.